being slow

I recently started listening to the Tim Ferris podcast, and in one of the episode the guest was the founder of WordPress/Automattic, Matt.

I started listening and the first thought that came to mind was “How slow does it talk?”

Matt talks slowly, he takes his time without adding “ehm, ahm”, etc.
A wonderful way to talk and value every single words without breaking the normal conversation flow.

For a 31 years old man, that’s something.

I came to believe we should pursue slowness and avoid F-words, or vulgarity in general.
Two years ago I wouldn’t have said the same thing, but know I’m very fond of this principle.

Removing vulgarity will allow you to give more value to your talk, giving it authority, power, energy.
Slowing your talk will also allow you to think (strange, right?), to choose words wisely, and to take better decisions.

presenting information in the right way

Today while I was waiting for the train I ordered a croissant.

There were many of them,all beautiful.
I asked for one with apricot jam, and then when it arrived I noticed that it was different from the one in the most visible part.

It wasn’t fresh, just a frozen good for fast food.

Only in that moment I realized the difference between what you see and what you get.
In websites we strive to make this distinction as much little as possible. Doing our best to comply with our users expectations, because, you know, getting tricked sucks.

Marketing, in many places, is still defined by how good you show things of, despite the delusion you give to your client after the goods get delivered.

let the sunshine in

It’s a sunny day here in Italy, and we hang out after lunch in the sunlight.
After a cold winter today it’s almost a hot day, and staying outside is nice, really nice.

I often forget how much pleasure you can get from just staying in the light of the sun.
It’s not just about relaxing, it’s about enjoying the beauty of the world, being part of it, letting the light come in.

would you extend your life?

Today we were talking about Elysium Health, a new product that should slow down the aging process of humans.

They are just pills, and they say the project is backed by nobel prize winners.

Life is a curious topic, I am now reading Seneca “On the shortness of life” and talking about life, aging process, is sure curious.
Is life worth extending?

A friend of mine would absolutely pay to extend his current life, meaning the quality of his mind and body together.
He said that, if he could gain 10 more years of this life, he would pay instantly.

That is probably not possible today, but the dilemma remains: Would you extend your life?

It’s not just a matter of paying for it. We are already paying for a lot of things, so paying for one more, even if it is for life, shouldn’t raise much concern.
In this situation I think it’s worth considering the generic question of extending life .

Many (or all) would just say yes, why not?
I would have probably said the same some years ago.

But I can’t help thinking about the Seneca book.
It’s not about the quality of life, it’s about living fully every single day.

He, who lives every day at the fullest, can die tomorrow with no regrets, because he know he lived the life fully.

To me Seneca is right, it’s not about extending life, it’s about extending our mindfulness in everyday life.
It’s about taking chances, making time for the loved ones, every single day.

stand up and nourish your life

Standing up for yourself as a way to cultivate yourself is not very in the news right now.
We are more attracted to standing up for other people rights or standing up to build credibility or have some deserved attention.
The latter things, the one focused on yourself, are more often then not the results of the need to be seen, to show up.

It’s normal, we all have that. But what would happen if we nourished our lives?
Nourishing them as a way to cultivate what’s good and beautiful, to grow our compassion, our empathy, to deepen the relationships we have, to ensure we smile and have no regrets.
I’m not talking about social status, work, etc.
I’m talking about the inner part of yourself, the purest one. The one that doesn’t feel the need to achieve but the need to share and help.

It’s uncommon, but it’s worth it.

accountability and the exposure of dreams

I always wonder what it takes to be accountable, to make it till the end, to reach your goals.

I think that one of the best way to ensure this is to expose our will to others.
Expose them to our dreams, the real one, not the faraway dreams you won’t do, but the ones you are committed to.

This way you create an informational gap between you and other people so that they will expect some action from you.

The best way to do it is sharing it online, let it be on a blog post or on a Facebook status and then share it with the people you trust.

It might be frightening but that fear will keep you accountable

accepting failure is a matter of questions

What will you do when you fail is something that might mark your life.

Success, failure, are just steps of a process of research, and as such shouldn’t contain sadness.

They are just part of life.
But when we talk about failure, sadness appears because you’re implicitly judging yourself for not being able to reach your goal.

We confuse the failure in the process with a failure with ourselves, when it’s really not.
We just have to find the right way to do it.

I believe failure and the resulting sadness is all a matter of questions.
The wrong questions are something like

  1. why am I failing so much?
  2. why am I such a failure?
  3. why can’t I do it?

They are generic questions, and some of them assume the problem is you as a whole being, not your actions or choices.

The good questions instead are precise, defined, clear

  • I failed doing this, was it because A, B or C?
  • What could I change to make it?
  • Is there anything else I can learn to improve?

Success is just a part of the process too. So don’t be fooled from it.

When you succeed avoid thinking you won’t fail again.

the synonym for passion is caring

Have you ever wanted to stop doing something?
Or, worse, did you stopped doing something you once loved because you didn’t care about it anymore?

This is a usual setup when we experience a Burnout in a work environment.
When you experience a burnout you suddenly (at least for me) try to save yourself by reducing the things you do.

Not the one you need to do, just the added value you were contributing to your daily work.
And the reason is often because we stop caring about things.

Passion, therefore, is not only a synonym of what we love, but it’s more than ever shows how much deeply we care .

Passion isn’t only driven by how much we like things but it’s mainly driven by how much we care about them or their results.

If you find yourself lacking passion, ask: is there a reason why I don’t care anymore?

you should track the small steps

A year is a long time.

It passes like a day, I know, but in fact during one entire year lots of good and bad shit happens and we end up forgetting some of them.

That’s why we should keep track of what we are doing.
To remember, to love. to discover what was wonderful, to remember every single step along this journey.

There will always be bad times, and those times will stay attached to your memory way more better than the good ones.
So make space for the ones worth remembering, the good, the wonderful, the beautiful.

Make space for them so they won’t be a number and you’ll end up thinking that yes, it was a long journey, but it was worth the trouble.

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